What To Do With An Old Bicycle

Finished bicycle basket

I love bike riding. We used to bike for miles and miles during the summer months. I especially loved riding the long trails that are refurbished old railroad beds here in Wisconsin. You can bike through the entire state on those flat, groomed trails. They are well maintained and take you through some of the pretty countryside in the Midwest. There is no better way to see the state than to bike through it.

However, it’s been years since I owned a bike, and even longer since I took the time to go for a ride. Until now. #Iamcheap

 

bicycle before painting

One of my girl friends passed this bike on to me. She doesn’t ride it anymore and it was just collecting dust in her garage. It was over all in good shape, but had a bit of rust here and there. I loved the old fashioned character of it. However, it was just sort of a blah color. It needed PIZAZZ.

Rustoleum spray paint

You know me, I have a basement full of PIZAZZ fixers, including a ton of spray paint. I rummaged around and came up with some Rustoleum Spray paint in Gloss Key Lime Green and Seaside Blue. By the way, if you spray paint at all, you simply must have one of these Comfort Grip tools to add to your spray can, it makes a nice even coat and saves your fingers from getting tired. It also gives you a very streamlined jet of paint, which is a lifesaver for doing fine detail work on such as this bike. Trust me, you need it! I also use plastic gloves to protect my hands when I paint, it’s so much easier than scraping your hands til they are raw!

Time to DIY!

bicycle in progress

The first step was to cover the larger parts of the bike that I didn’t want to paint with plastic grocery bags. I covered the seat, the handle bars, the pedals and the basket on the back of the bike with bags. It’s not scientific, but it works.

3M Scotch Blue Tape

Then I started covering the finer details with 3M Scotch Blue Painters Tape. I covered the break pads, the fenders, the brake wires and a few things that I have no idea what they are but they looked important.

I found some cardboard circles in my basement that were just laying around, and used those inside the tire and wheel spokes to keep paint from getting on them.

3M Sandblaster_

The next step was to rough up the paint with a 3M Sandblaster sponge. This coarse sponge is the best tool ever, it easily fit between the smaller parts of the bike and made the sanding go really fast. Then I wiped the grit off with a dry towel and I was ready to paint.

painting the bike

I laid the bike down to paint, then waited for it to dry before turning it over. The spray paint made the painting go really fast, and it covered in one coat. How awesome is that??

I painted the basket at the very end, using the cardboard to shield the rest of the bike from the sprayer. I chose the Key Lime color for the basket, I love it!

It looks rather silly, but it worked quite well. I would say 98% of what I didn’t want to paint stayed clean, there were one or two areas that I had to scrape paint off in the end with the sanding block, but you can’t really tell where they are in the finished product.

After I started I also realized that the front wheel of the bike could come off, so I ended up removing that completely. I am sure that you can remove the back one too, but I don’t know how to do it and it seemed too complicated to bother with. #Iamnotmechanical

Blue bike finished

The blue color makes me HAPPY!

Bicycle Pin

The new color reminds me of the good old days when bikes were all the rage. Yes, I am that old! Now, I need is a tune up and I will be on the road! I can’t wait!

See you on the trail!

Sign me up!

Dss_invoice_logo

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

2 thoughts on “What To Do With An Old Bicycle

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *