Growing Amaryllis in Water

On the coldest of winter days, it’s hard to think about the garden. I find that I can spend my winter days planning the green season and winter time goes so much faster. One of my favorite winter past times is growing things indoors. My father used to grow the most beautiful Amaryllis, and I have been learning how to work with them the last few years. 
My issue is that I hate the plastic pots they come in, and I always have trouble accessing the frozen garden shed to reach my pots and potting soil in the middle of the winter. I am not much for planning ahead.

I went into my favorite green house recently. They were having a sale on their Amaryllis bulbs. After Christmas is my favorite time to pick up more bulbs for next year. You can really get some good deals this time of year. I have paid as much as $10.00 per bulb in the past, but after the holidays they are always reduced. I picked these up for $1.75 each.
I couldn’t resist this new double pink combination, Elvas. On my way out the door, I happened to spot one bulb they had “planted” atop a glass vase.
Stop the presses! I didn’t know you could grow these bulbs in water!

My garden senses were going crazy with delight. What could be more simple and beautiful?
I just happened to have a similar vase, with a tapered neck opening at home. My large bulb fit beautifully into the crook of the neck. I added water and in no time at all it began to sprout in our sunny window.
I also decided to dry a wide mouth mason jar, it worked just as well.
In my bulb stash from last year, I had a left over mini-bulb. It didn’t bloom last year, but I decided to try it in the water anyway. I love how it looks on top of the blue mason jar. I also added some colored beads to the bottom of the jar for fun. You could use any sort of vase filler for a decorative look, or some river rocks. I can’t wait to see if it will bloom. I don’t even remember what color it is, I rather like to be surprised when it finally opens.
It was a smallish bulb, so I cut apart a wooden skewer to balance it over the top of the jar. I poked the skewer into the bulb in three places and it seems very sturdy on the jar.
Amaryllis bulbs generally take 4-6 weeks to bloom, but they are sure off to a great start! I occasionally change the water to keep the water from getting full of mildew.
Another tip, don’t let the bulb rest in the water. It will rot the bottom and will not bloom. I find the roots do well with about 1/2″ or more of space between the top of the water and the bottom of the bulb.
I am counting down the days until they open.
Are your garden senses tingling yet?


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