Sewing Camisoles

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31 Days of Sewing Day 3

Back to the drawing board today, finishing the last piece in this sassy little lingerie collection from easy Vogue pattern #V8888.

I don’t think this pattern is as easy as they said it was.

It’s cut on the bias, which is notoriously stretchy and hard to handle. It makes cutting and sewing harder because no matter how hard you try, the fabric always moves.

A few extra pins help, be sure your needles are sharp. You may need to baste here and there to make sure it all comes together the way you want.

One more thing, I used a slightly bigger stitch length and looser tension than on the other pieces I made (this will also keep your seams from puckering).

Most of the time when I sew, I use a small 2.5 stitch. For the satin camisole, try a stitch length of 3 or 3.5. If you do need to rip the seams out, it will be easier and won’t stretch the fabric as much.

This little camisole has contrasting lace on the bodice and yoke.

I also added some extra lace trim at the hem since I had it left over from yesterday’s pj pants project.

I must admit I changed the sewing process a bit on this garment.

Have I mentioned that I consider the pattern directions to be more like guidelines?

Many times there is an easier way to sew things.

I don’t know why they make things so complicated when they can be simpler. I think more people would learn to sew and be less frustrated if commercial patterns were more straight forward. This is my soap box.

I didn’t use elastic on the top edge of the back piece (which the pattern called for), preferring to just use a narrow rolled hem on it. Not really sure why they would put elastic on the back edge of a camisole to begin with, I think it’s rather cumbersome.

I also eliminated the extra lace on the back part of the body, who really pays that much attention to the back of things anyway?

Ideally, I would have used a narrow lace trim to finish all the way around the top from the front bodice strap, around to the back, and to the other side. However, my local fabric stores didn’t have any 1/2″ black laces in stock. I ended up using a narrow rolled hem instead.

Hard to believe that a simple item like narrow lace is hard to find, but it is. You may have better luck with white lace if you want to use this technique, the stores had plenty of that.

The rest of the camisole construction turned out pretty well, I didn’t really have to redo much of it.

There were only 4 seams after all.

Thank heavens for little blessings!

It was a better sewing day today.

I really appreciate all your sweet words of encouragement during my time of sewing struggle.

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The stretchy bias cut fabric in this pattern can make this item a bit harder to fit, I had to cut it down slightly because it was too big. I would recommend basting the side seams together and trying it on before doing your final stitching.

The other change I made was to the neckline, the pattern called for bias binding on the neck and the lace appliquéd on top. I couldn’t find a lace I liked for this, so I used the scalloped edge of the yard goods to finish the neck and zig zagged it in place over the lining.

It’s a bit simpler that way, only one sewing process. I am always looking for ways to speed things up.

I am impatient, have I mentioned that?

Whenever possible, I like to use lace edging instead of hems, its faster and easier to zig-zag it on over the raw edges instead of hemming. This is one of the reasons sewing intimates are easy to sew. Unless you are having a bad sewing day, of course.

Tip: Use two different colored threads to sew on the lace. I used black on the spool of the machine, and red in the bobbin for an “invisible” stitch on both sides.

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This is the finished 3 piece set. I am contemplating adding a tiny rosebud bow to the center front of the camisole bodice.

What do you think? Rosebud? Yes, or no?

You should have seen the looks on the faces of my teenage sons when they saw me sewing this trio. They raised their brows and gave me funny looks.

The questions in their eyes said: “Mom, what are you doing?”

Wisely, they never said a single word.

They know better than that.

I would tell them that I do these things to just keep them on their toes.

And to keep them guessing.

Just so you know, this probably the only time you will ever see slinky lingerie on this blog.

Hope you will still be here tomorrow.

 I will finish my last piece of intimate apparel, this one will be a fuzzy warm robe!

Then it’s back to the practical items, blouses will be next!

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