Succulent Cross

Succulents are my one of my all time favorite things, and so are topiaries.  Here is an easy DIY project to add some green to your decor – a succulent cross! 

DIY Succulent Cross|Designers Sweet Spot|www.designerssweetspot.com

 

It’s finally warm enough to spend some time out on the porch. My first priority of course, are plants and accessories. Never mind that there is no where to sit, or that my pile of rummage sale junk still sits in the corner of the porch. A pretty front door is so welcoming, and something green by the door just makes it so much more inviting.Succulent Cross on door

Succulent Cross materials

Succulents are my one of my all time favorite things, and so are topiaries. I used to work in a green house and we planted dozens of topiaries early in the season. Topiaries were always hot items and they really aren’t difficult to plant. Succulents work well in them because they have shallow roots and don’t need a ton of water. I found this cross topiary online last year and thought it would be perfect for my Easter decor. This would also be a nice project for a grave site planting, as the succulents don’t need a lot of maintenance.

The first step is to soak your topiary in a bucket of water for 10-15 minutes until saturated. Then it’s ready to plant. I only used 6 plants for this project, but I broke them down into smaller pieces as I planted them so they wouldn’t be too big for the narrow parts of the cross.

Succulent Cross close up

I used a screw driver to poke holes into the moss, then inserted the plants. The plants filled up the cross quite well and will grow into place even more over the garden season.

I used a Command Strip to hang it on the glass door.

whole door with cross

I will have to take the cross down and soak it in a tray of water when it is dry since I don’t want to mess up the wooden finish on the door by watering it directly.

cross on the door

I found the blue hydrangea plant recently at Costco. My cross dripped a bit after it hung for a while, you can see a bit of moisture on the lower part of the door. I will have to remember to let it drain for a bit before hanging it up after watering. I have planted the Bunny Topiary in past years, you can read that tutorial here.

Now that my door is ready, perhaps I need to go out and look for an Easter Bonnet?

Enjoy your Holy Week!

 

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DIY Succulent Cross|Designers Sweet Spot|www.designerssweetspot.com

Spooky Succulent Garden

finished succulent garden

Halloween isn’t one of my favorite holidays.

However, I usually have one small decoration around this time of year.

This time, I made a Spooky Succulent Garden.

Succulents are about the spookiest thing I can think of.

They are sharp, odd shapes and colors, and have almost no roots. The best thing is that they require almost no care.

Supplies for garden2

I started with a saucer filled with cactus soil and some succulents that needed transplanting.

Supplies for garden

I came across these mini figurines at the Dollar Tree and I thought they would work great for this project. I had the crows left over from my decorations from last year, but I think they also came from the Dollar Tree.

in progress

To make the garden, I decided where to put the plants first. I wanted the “castle” to be the center of attention at the back of the tray and tried it out on a plastic container.  In the end, I decided to use a flower frog to put it on.  If you don’t have a frog, a plastic container would still work. Then I placed the trees, sticking them down into the soil to anchor them.

placing the plants

I purchased black aquarium gravel at Walmart to make the plants stand out and give the entire garden that spooky appearance. I removed the castle because I wanted it to sit on top of the soil along with the other figurines. I put the gravel over the soil, and patted it in place.

macro spooky succulents

I placed the castle on top of the soil next. The castle is sitting on a flower frog that I covered with floral moss for a bit of spooky, dead grassy interest. A few topiary pins hold it into place. If you use a plastic container, you will have to glue the moss on the container.

All these supplies came from the Dollar Tree.

I love the little crow in the tree, he is my favorite. I also love the pink Where-wolf, he cracks me up! Did you know Where-wolves wore pink? Neither did I!

At any rate, the colors in the figurines work well with the succulents.

birds eye view

A few wisps of spider web, and a couple of little black spiders make the display complete. I added a few extra rocks, just to make things interesting.

finished succulent garden

Spooky garden porch

Perhaps this little garden is not so spooky after all. Our giant squeaky rat and the Mamma crow stand guard over the succulents on our porch.

Thanks for stopping by!

I made it to week two of the So You Think Your Crafty contest! Thanks for all your support! The overall winner of this weeks competition is featured on SYTYC today. More projects to come, there are 7 more weeks to go!

 

Succulent Ice Cube Tray

I love getting creative with my planters, see how I transformed an old ice cube tray into a new home for my succulents! 

Dear General Electric,

I’ll bet that you never would have guess your ice cube trays would go out of fashion just like your old refrigerators. They had their day, and we loved them, but now no one really uses them anymore.Succulent Ice Cube Tray

Except me.

Only I don’t use ice, since I get enough of that during our cold Wisconsin winters.

I use my vintage General Electric Ice Cube Tray for planting succulents, I love it. The Mid-Century soft pink metallic color looks great with the colorful plants.

Succulent Ice Cube Tray

 

ice cube tray before

I used 7 tiny succulents for this project that were purchased at Home Depot, I also purchased cactus soil and some pebbles.

Redi-cube

It only took me about 5 minutes to plant your little ice cube tray.

First I filled each ice cube compartment with dirt.

Then I planted my succulents. Several of them were easy to separate into smaller plants with my fingers, but I could also have used a sharp knife.

The succulents have very small roots so separating them and fitting the roots in-between the metal ice compartment slats isn’t a problem.

I left some of the compartments empty to give the larger plants room to grow a bit.

I added more dirt.

Then I added the rocks on top of the exposed soil.

A light watering finished it off.

It was not necessary to poke holes in the ice cube tray for extra drainage. I just have to be careful not to over water it.

You never know, I may actually want to make actual ice cubes some day.

Or not.

GE, I love your old “Redi-Cube” company logo.

It’s very quaint.

finished

I think I need more of these trays.

I will be haunting rummage sales this summer to find them.

Tabletop garden

The Succulent Ice Cube Tray is now part of my ever growing spring table top garden.

Can you tell I am ready for warmer days?

What’s blooming at your house?

Thanks, GE!

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Meet Betty Bling

Making a Faux Garden Head isn’t as hard as it looks, keep reading to meet Betty Bling! 

Meet Betty Bling (Faux Garden Head)|Designers Sweet Spot|www.designerssweetspot.com

 

 

Meet Betty Bling (Faux Garden Head)|Designers Sweet Spot|www.designerssweetspot.com

My Gardening Obsession

 I am obsessed with gardening. It’s one of my compulsive behaviors. Like my obsession with ButterfliesGiving Away Books, and Learning About My Dead Relatives. Did you know that I once painted the 11 rooms in our big, old Victorian house 33 times in a span of 10 years? I really do get obsessed with things. I just can’t help myself.
Meet Betty Bling (Faux Garden Head)|Designers Sweet Spot|www.designerssweetspot.com
 Right now, my gardening obsession comes from the fact that it’s late spring and it’s still cold outside in Wisconsin. I am desperate for an outlet since I still can’t plant anything in the garden.

 If you follow me on Pintrest, you will know that I have had this garden head photo pinned for a while. You see, I used to work at a greenhouse. Every spring the owner would get a shipment of these heads and they would sell like hotcakes. Every year I would promise myself I would buy one but I never did. Probably because they retail for $75.00 or more and just didn’t fit into my thrifty home school mom budget. But, I still wanted one. Badly. Have you ever put something off that you regretted?
Recently I spied this foam head at the craft store (Hobby Lobby) and I got to thinking…. Hummmm, I wonder if that would work as a garden head? It was only a few dollars so I decided to try it. I also picked up some Magikote Primer and some Krylon Stone Metallic Spray Paint. I decided to name my garden  head Betty Bling.

Supplies Needed:

•Magikote Primer

•Foam Craft Head

•Krylon Stone Metallic Paint

•Sharp knife

•wine bottle

•pebbles

•trailing succulent

•old jewelry and old glasses

Garden Head Directions:

•First of all I painted Betty with 2 coats of the Magikote Primer. It seals the foam and makes it ready for the finish coat of paint.
•I put Betty atop an empty wine bottle to dry. She has a hole in the base of her neck that works great for this purpose. My kids said it looked creepy. Nah. I don’t think so.
•When she was dry, I drew a 6″ circle at the top of her head with a compass. I used it as a guideline for painting, I didn’t want to paint the portion I knew I was going to remove later for planting.
•Then I sprayed Betty with the Stone Metallic paint. I used two coats which would have dried sooner had I brought it into the house. Why do I not think of these things until it’s too late?
 •When she was finally dry, I hollowed out the top of her head with a sharp knife. I probably should have purchased the special knife for cutting foam at the craft store, but instead I used a parring knife which really made a mess of things. Sometimes I am a slow learner.
•Finally, I made a hole for drainage…..
 Seems like this was easy since she already had a hole at the bottom of her neck.
•Then I added some small pebbles to the wine bottle for stability.
•I fell in love with this succulent from Home Depot and decided it would be perfect for Betty’s hair.
• Betty got some Bling with a few pieces of my old jewelry and some extra glasses.
I hadn’t intended to keep the garden head Betty on the wine bottle permanently, but I kind of like her there. She looks more interesting floating in the air.  Maybe I will change my mind about this when it comes time to put her outside, but for now she’s going to stay put.
Someone said she kind of looks like me. Nah, I don’t see it. Do you?
Have a great day!
p.s. I have gotten some of the nicest comments lately, thank you so much for reading and commenting! I really appreciate it!

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Faux Garden Head (Meet Betty Bling)

 

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